White snowdrop sample – filling in

Quite a lot of stitching but none of it very interesting, so I’ll cover it all in the one post.  Still using the same colour, I’ve filled in the entire design in what’s supposed to be long and short stitch but I suspect has really turned into split stitch.  No shading, just white. Here’s some – Read the full article…

White snowdrop sample – outline

For this I’m only using one colour: white: That’s Madeira stranded cotton no. 2401. Part of the outline in split stitch (against a black background so you can see it): And the rest: I’ll start to fill it in next.

White snowdrop sample

Same design, slightly different approach.  This time, I want to see how it works in white-on-white.  I’ll be using the same cut-out-and-apply technique so it’s not proper whitework, of course, but I’m interested to see how convincing – or otherwise! – it is. So starting out the same as before, tracing the design onto silver – Read the full article…

Silver snowdrop sample – completed

With the snowdrop cut out, I needed to stitch it to a background fabric, but as this is an experiment, I decided to try a completely different fabric to usual: net. Pinned to a square of white net: The pins all go over the stitching, not into it, and are enough to hold it in – Read the full article…

Silver snowdrop sample – cutting out

And now the bit I’ve really not been looking forward to: cutting it out.  It’s quite a fiddly design with quite a few skinny bits, so the potential for disaster is quite high. No photo of this bit, but as is now becoming routine, I painted over the back of the stitching with watered-down PVA – Read the full article…

Silver snowdrop sample – the snowdrops

Another ghastly photo, but hopefully you can more or less tell that I’ve finished the satin stitch for the upper leaves and  around the edge of the snowdrops: That’s all the embroidery done – now to cut it out…

Silver snowdrop sample – satin stitch

To hold the silver mesh in place, I’m stitching over it in sating stitch around the edge; the double row of split stitch forms the extent of the satin stitch, leaving as much of the mesh exposed as possible. The roots first: Stems and most of the leaves: The large single leaf: My stitching looks – Read the full article…

Silver snowdrop sample – outline

A short post for a fair amount of sewing: using split stitch, I’ve worked a double row of stitches around the outline of the design, and just inside it: I want the silver mesh to form the design and so be as visible as possible, but it also needs to be held firmly in place – Read the full article…

Silver snowdrop sample

Another sample piece.  You may remember that earlier this year when working on the Apple Tree fire screen I had a go at using Italian tubular mesh wire ribbon but it didn’t work at all and I took it off. This was the right thing to do for that particular project, but it’s been at – Read the full article…