Embroidered panel: Ruskin Roses

My latest piece is finished and framed: It’s an original design, but I was aiming for an Arts and Crafts look, hence the title! It was worked using the same technique I’ve been employing for quite a few things lately: hand embroidered with Madeira stranded cotton in long and short stitch onto gold organza. A – Read the full article…

Dog Roses: an embroidered panel

The final completed piece is of wild roses: This is worked in long and short stitch, then applied to a background of ivory cotton velvet. A close-up: I’ve covered in detail elsewhere the techniques I use for these pieces, but as a quick recap: the design is traced onto a gold organza, just a cheap – Read the full article…

Orchids: an embroidered panel

The next embroidery project I’ve completed is a surface embroidered panel of orchids, in long and short stitch: In a little more detail: I have one more completed piece to show you, so that’s next!

‘Teamwork’ bees: finished

The ‘Teamwork’ panel of embroidered and appliquéd bees has now been stretched onto some mount board and is ready to show off.  So here it is! And a close up: Back to the beading next, I think.

‘Teamwork’ bees: appliqué wings and honeycomb

The bees’ bodies have been completed but don’t look right at all without their wings, but that’s about to change, with the addition of some appliqué. Using little running stitches worked from the back, where the full design is marked up onto lining fabric, I transferred the wing outlines to the front, background, fabric. I want – Read the full article…

‘Teamwork’ bees: starting sewing

With the design transferred to the back of the fabric and it stretched onto an embroidery frame, it’s time to start sewing. Firstly, I need the design on the front of the fabric, where I can see it. The background fabric is silk dupion in ivory; I don’t want to mark that directly as it’s – Read the full article…

Primroses

Sorry for the long silence – longer than I’d realised, looking back.  I’ve had other, non-sewing, things going on lately and haven’t been doing as much embroidery as usual. I have been doing some, though; there doesn’t seem much need to walk you through the technique I used as it’s just the same as the – Read the full article…

Nasturtium roundel – finished

The final step, with the embroidery finished, is to cut it out and apply it to a background. As usual now, I painted the back with dilute PVA glue, and after leaving it overnight to dry thoroughly, cut it out – very carefully. I’m using an ivory velvet for the background; here’s the embroidery cut out – Read the full article…

Nasturtium roundel – flowers

The last bit of embroidery on this project: the flowers. With the leaves, I used the lightest shade on the outside of the leaf and got darker towards the centre; here I’m doing the opposite, starting with the darkest shade and getting lighter further in. The darkest shade is Madeira stranded cotton no. 0204, and – Read the full article…

Nasturtium roundel – flower buds

A bit more than the buds, actually, but with my usual botanical ignorance I don’t know what the bit at the back of the flowers is called.  Whatever it is, I’ve done them, too. Anyway, the buds proper at the centre of the design, worked in long and short stitch in Madeira stranded cotton 0105 – Read the full article…